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What is so special about Josephus?

In Biblical Hebrew & Greek by Jonathan LipnickLeave a Comment

If you are a regular reader of this blog or have ever done any reading about the first century Land of Israel (other than the New Testament itself) chances are you will have come across the name “Josephus”. His name seems to pop up incessantly both in scholarly literature and in popular …

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Is a donkey suitable for the Messiah?

In Biblical Hebrew & Greek by Jonathan LipnickLeave a Comment

In  many languages, the word “donkey” (or its older form “ass”) is commonly used to refer to a fool, a person who is so stubborn that their very intelligence is called into question. For example, in Farsi the word for donkey (olagh), is a common way of saying “stupid person.” Similarly, in Spanish …

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Why the Valley of Elah?

In Biblical Hebrew & Greek by Jonathan Lipnick1 Comment

Among the many stories of warfare that are described in the Hebrew Bible, perhaps the most famous is the epic battle between David and Goliath (1 Samuel chapter 17). David, still a shepherd boy living in Bethlehem, is able to fell the greatest Philistine warrior with a mere stone. Most readers of this story …

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Did the face of Moses have horns?

In Biblical Hebrew & Greek by Jonathan Lipnick1 Comment

Michelangelo’s famous sculpture of Moses – exhibited in the Church of St Peter in Chains in Rome –  is one of the most celebrated pieces of High Renaissance art. It depicts a seated Moses nobly holding the tablets of the Law after having descended from Mount Sinai for the second time (Exodus …

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On the road to Emmaus

In Biblical Hebrew & Greek by Jonathan LipnickLeave a Comment

Following the Resurrection on Easter Sunday,  the Gospels describe several incidents in which the risen Jesus miraculously appears to his followers. The reactions of all these witnesses follow a similar pattern: obliviousness followed by identification, fear and finally recognition. For example, Jesus appears to Mary Magdalene at the tomb (John 20:11-18), to the disciples …

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Was Palm Sunday actually Sukkot?

In Holy Land Studies by Jonathan LipnickLeave a Comment

This year, 2016, the world’s two main Christian calendars mark Easter more than a month apart. Western Christians, who follow the Gregorian calendar, celebrated Easter on March 27. Eastern Orthodox Christian, who use the older Julian calendar, will not celebrate Easter until May 1. Given that we are currently in the intermediate period …